Tag Archives: MMIS

IT procurement cycle stuck on spin? Here are 3 ways to get it sorted.

No matter the size of the state nor the type of system being developed, large government technology projects seem to share the same time frame: long, convoluted and often very different from the end users’ initial goals. To learn why, we studied a number of Medicaid Managed Information System (MMIS) development projects from across the […]
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Calculating the incalculable

We often hear from state program integrity units that the work they do goes unrecognized. Yet when quizzed on how they promote their efforts — which could result in millions of dollars in savings and recoveries over just one year — they often reveal a limited understanding of how to calculate these savings. After all, […]
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Ditching MMIS full-system procurement for a “services-only” approach: A quick “how-to” on administrative operations

Adopting a service-based Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) approach may require that you reorganize some of your administrative operations. For example, you’re probably using your MMIS for capitation payments and the collection of encounter data — but you don’t have to. You can make capitation payments through your finance system and feed your encounter data […]
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Rethinking your MMIS? A services-only approach does qualify for enhanced FFP.

Many people have asked whether a service-based model for Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) qualifies for enhanced federal funding. The answer is yes. As you know, the federal government requires states to undergo certification to receive enhanced Federal Financial Participation (FFP), which pays 90 percent for MMIS implementation and 75 percent for ongoing operations. What […]
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Rethinking your MMIS: Change is good

“He who hesitates is lost.” “The early bird gets the worm.” And for those of you old enough to remember a popular Alka-Seltzer® commercial, “Try it, you’ll like it.” No matter how you say it, popular wisdom suggests that getting in on the ground floor of change is good. And nothing begs for change more […]
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