Tag Archives: integrated care

Who should make up the team that directs your move to accountable care?

As the U.S. health care system moves away from reimbursement models that reward volume and toward those that reward care coordination – traditional industry roles are blurring. • New #5in5 video: Fee for value requires revised relationships As this integration accelerates, organizations must build new governance structures that can provide strategic direction and accountability. That […]
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Released but not forgotten: Improving the patient discharge process

It used to be that hospitals behaved like restaurants. Once a patron eats a meal and pays their bill, they walk out the door and the restaurant’s responsibility to provide a great product and service ends. In today’s regulatory environment, however, patient care doesn’t end when a patient checks out of the hospital.

Understanding the root causes of patient rebounding

No health care provider ever wants to see a patient return to the ER or their office due to complications from a prior illness. But emergency room rebounding and hospital readmissions happen, and it’s up to healthcare leaders to understand how and why to fix the problem.

Preventing patient rebounding is about more than just readmissions

You won’t get much argument from leaders at provider organizations about the damages—both financial and clinical—caused by preventable hospital readmissions. Every year, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is hit for $17.5 billion for readmitted Medicare patients.

Risky business for providers: Planning for financial realities and capacity downturns

Ultimately, the financial side and the clinical side of the ACO equation need to be in balance. Adjusting to the financial realities of value-based contracting is essential. Therefore, our fourth risk-bearing action for provider organizations is financial and capacity planning.

Risky business for providers: Population-based planning in provider risk-bearing arrangements

Provider organizations that want to bear patient risk need to be informed by their local markets and the attending health care concerns that come with that market. That’s why our third action that leads to bearing risk is population-based planning.