Tag Archives: acute care

Discover how patients access care to understand need for new solutions

The need for better care coordination becomes clear when you see the results of surveys showing the number of patients taking multiple medications and visiting multiple doctors. In spring of 2016, the New York Times reported on a national survey, conducted by Harvard researchers, that found 39 percent of people over age 65 use five or more […]
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Data sharing: Putting an end to communication breakdowns

One of the buzzwords in health care reform is “interoperability.” But what’s behind the buzz? Interoperability is the ability to share data across systems and analyze and use the data. But it’s not just about sharing for sharing’s sake. The goal is to use information to create bigger, more complete data sets that can power […]
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Timing a transition to value-based care

Once providers decide they will transition to value-based care, the next question is when should they make their move. Providers can do more than pick an arbitrary date. There are tools to help organizations make informed decisions on transition timing. Providers can conduct a financial impact assessment. Doing so allows groups to model several factors […]
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Tap into the “greatest intellect in the health care industry”

When a health system surveyed its physicians, it asked a question some might find more suited to MBAs than MDs. North Carolina-based Wilmington Health asked: Is the rate of change within Wilmington Health less than the rate of change in the industry? It’s a question focused on competition and market dynamics — elements of health […]
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Redefine acute care to combine fee-for-service (FFS) with care management.

Badly broken bones, appendicitis, hemorrhages and head injuries mean there will be a need for acute care hospitals no matter how the healthcare industry changes. But we need to change how we think about acute care in relation to the rest of healthcare. A traditional definition says acute care is the opposite of chronic or long-term care. […]
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