Category Archives: by Optum Analytics team

Weintraub believes data usage needs next wave of evolution

When you take a look at all the data systems that the health care industry as a whole has in place, Michael Weintraub, President and CEO, Optum Analytics, said in an interview conducted at the Forbes HealthCare Summit, the challenge is that there are hundreds if not thousands of disparate enterprise software systems that need […]
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The journey to value: Navigating the journey from providing care to managing health

There’s little doubt that health care is transitioning from fee-for-service to fee-for-value. Everyone seems to be getting on board: commercial payers are spending billions on risk-based contracts while the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is putting its clout behind its accountable care organization (ACO) and other value-based purchasing initiatives. What’s not clear is […]
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Weintraub foresees future data usage exploding

The amount and depth of health care information on individual patients and entire populations is huge and growing larger by the day, Michael Weintraub, President and CEO, Optum Analytics, said in an interview conducted at the Forbes HealthCare Summit, and this data represents a tremendous opportunity to influence the decision making process. “The capabilities are […]
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Sentara Medical Group puts improved predictive modeling into action

In a recent post, we discussed usability factors in predictive analytics. Today’s final post in the predictive analytics series will discuss an example of a provider that has used prediction to inform its population health management program. Predicting hospitalizations helps Sentara practice proactive care. Sentara Medical Group has 380 primary and specialty care physicians in […]
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Today’s predictive analytics should provide timely, actionable intelligence

In a previous post on predictive analytics, we discussed the variables that determined predictive accuracy. Today’s topic is usability of predictive results. Old news is only good for wrapping fish. The point of prediction in health care is to head off bad outcomes before they happen. So for predictive usability, data must be timely. In […]
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Better predictive modeling requires bigger, more varied, higher quality data sets

In a previous blog about predictive analytics, we discussed how comprehensive health care data is necessary for a high degree of prediction. In this post, we’ll discuss the variables that increase predictive accuracy. The larger the better. As the sample size of a predictive model grows, the model’s uncertainty level and degree of bias decreases. […]
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Evaluating data’s impact on sepsis care

The previous post introduced Saint Thomas Health’s efforts to use data to reduce sepsis mortality within its patient population. This post will discuss some of the results of the organization’s efforts. Getting information into the hands of doctors and nurses treating potentially septic patients is key. As important is the collection and analysis of vast […]
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Improved predictive analytics better identify high-risk patients

Health care providers have struggled in the past to accurately identify their full cohort of high-risk patients. Doctors can have an accurate sense of whether patients they see will become high-risk, but what about the patients within their population that don’t present? Too often, doctors only become aware of such patients’ conditions after an emergency […]
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Combining high-tech and high-touch with care guides

The previous blog post focused on how Minneapolis-based HealthEast applied data and analytics from Optum One to get great care management results. This final blog in the three-part series will show how care management is making a difference in patient lives. One relatively new element to care coordination that HealthEast put into practice was certified […]
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The battle against sepsis should include data and analytics

Sepsis—or blood poisoning—is the most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals, costing health care organizations more than $20 billion annually, according to the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Even worse, nearly 50 percent of the people who develop septic shock will die. Health care organizations, including Saint Thomas Health, a ministry of Ascension Health, are […]
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